Shipping

If you choose to have the bacon shipped to you it will come via USPS Priority Post.  Thats the US Mail “fast edition”.  Unlike UPS or FedEx they may not ring your door or they will try to put it in your mail box.  You should receive emails from our carrier telling you when it is delivered, but you will want to check to make sure it is not sitting in the sun or your mailbox for a week.

If you have any questions about your order, just send us an email at [email protected].

When you get your bacon toss it in the refrigerator.  I should be cool  when it arrives, but don’t worry if it is warm.  Bacon travels really well.  Bacon is a cured meat so it technically can be stored outside of refrigeration for extended periods of time, but we still recommend you refrigerate it once you receive it. 

Your bacon is stored in individual vacuum sealed bags to preserve freshness.  We then freeze it so that it travels well and remains cool in transit.  When it arrives you can toss it in the fridge or freezer and re-thaw it whenever you want to try your delicious new bacon.

Bacon SIZE

We invented (made up) the name a “Bacon Brick”.  It was a result of experimentation and literally became the building block of all the bacon that we make.

As a life long lover of bacon I found myself having to cut bacon in half so it would fit on sandwiches and then when I stored extra uncooked bacon in a zip lock bag the long strips wouldn’t fit properly in a quart or pint bag so I use to cut them in half.  

And then, when I cooked the half sizes pieces they always cooked more evenly.  It was easier to share with kids and people that like smaller portions (no bacon gets wasted).  So we thought, what’s stopping us from slicing our bacon in smaller slices to meet the needs of the end bacon lover. The answer was nothing except inertia and internet trolls. So we reinvented the bacon slice.

 

Bacon is usually sold by the pound and we found that that was just silly and arbitrary.  So instead we tried to figure out the perfect amount to minimize waste while also satisfying the needs of the modern family.  And it turns out  that 10oz was pretty much the right about for a meal for: 1) a family of 4 for breakfast, 2) a couple or for a romanic weekend, 3) an individual that wants just a couple slices a day for a week.

Depending on the thickness of the bacon and the shape of the belly a brick is usually 10 to 12 slices.

The shape of a bacon brick varies in much the same way that natural stones that make up wall will vary.  Some with be longer and thinner and others will be fatter and chunky.  Please don’t shape shame them.   They were just born this way.  

Every belly is different and we don’t press and flatten them out like commercial bacon manufactures do.  We just love the pork bellies the way that they come.   And if you keep an open mind you will find that you will love your bacon whatever shape it comes in.

A slab of bacon is roughly 1/4 of a pork belly.  This is approximately 3 bricks of bacon.  If you want unsliced bacon this is the smallest quantity we will ship.  Also if you are a big bacon eating family or having a bacon festival, we can slice this for you in your choice of thickness including the OMG which is just crazy awesome (like a bacon cutlet in every slice).

Cooking BACON

Cooking in the oven is the most consistent, reliable and cleanest way to make bacon. There is no need to pre-heat your oven just put it in and at the 15 minute mark check how its doing. If your oven is slow to heat it may take over 30 minutes.  We usually cook at 375 degrees F for about 25 to 30 minutes.  IF YOU COOK IN A PREHEATED OVEN IT WILL TAKE ABOUT 20 MINUTES

Use a cookie sheet and line it with parchment paper (aluminum foil is an ok substitute but not as good).  If you like extra crispy put the bacon on a cooling rack in the pan and the bacon on top.

We prefer a slightly chewier result with more flavor so we lay the bacon on the parchment paper and flip it once with about 5 to 8 minutes to go to make sure the bacon is cooked evenly on both sides. Cooking in its own fat will enhance the flavor, trust us.

Cooking on the stove top is best using a cast iron pan at medium heat.  I know you are eager to eat bacon, but be gentle.  Don’t cook on high heat, unless you want a quick way to burn bacon.  

Our bacon is thicker than most, so it needs a little more time to cook at a lower heat.  You may want to turn it over a couple times to cook evenly and make sure it does not curl up.  This usually takes 8 to 10 minutes.  I often turn off the heat for the last 2 minutes and let the bacon finish cooking in the hot pan.  

If you cook it a bit slower you will allow yourself to enjoy the amazing aroma of the cure flavor.  Remember that a lot of the flavor is the fat that will melt off, but allowing the bacon to cook in its own fat will maximized the flavor.

So far we believe these creations are either a mythical inventions or the devil’s device.  We are waiting for Tim to get back to us on the perfect cooking directions.  Thus far Tim appears to be a figment of our imagination.  So if you have the will test this out and get back to us.

Shame on you! It hurts me to even think about microwaving bacon.  This is not the 80’s where we tried to “nuke” everything just to save a couple minutes. We will post instructions if we can figure out how to cook great tasting bacon 4 minutes faster than the stove top.

Cooking CAVEMAN CANDY

Cooking in the oven is the easiest way to heat Caveman Candy.  We usually cook at 350 degrees F for about 8 to 12 minutes.  There is no need to pre-heat your oven just put it in and at the 8 minute mark check how its doing. If your oven is slow to heat it may take over 12 minutes.  IF YOU COOK IN A PREHEATED OVEN IT WILL TAKE ABOUT 6 MINUTES.

Use a cookie sheet and line it with parchment paper or aluminum foil.  If you like more caramelized candy just leave it in the oven. We often reheat any remaining candy and it gets better each time you cook it.  By the 3rd time it is harder and sweeter, but may be the best over-sized bacon bit you have every tried.

You may want to try adding caveman candy to your favorite chowder or chili as a great topper.  Add it to an omelet or put it in stir-fried rice.

Cooking on the stove top is best using a cast iron pan at medium  or medium low heat.  I know you are eager to eat your candy, but speed kills. 

Caveman candy is already twice cooked by the time you get it so it should only take about 5 to 8 minutes to heat it up and  caramelize  it too.  

If you cook it a bit slower you will allow yourself to enjoy the amazing aroma candy.  Gets you in the mood for just about anything you have planned.  Remember that a lot of the flavor is the fat that will melt off, so allow the candy to cook in its own fat to maximized the flavor and then pour it onto a bed of paper towel after it is cooked to absorb the excess fat.

Serving

Pour all of the extra grease from your pan into a “Bacon Bin” or dedicated container for bacon fat.  This is amazing stuff that makes cooking other foods delicious.

We recommend laying your fresh cooked bacon on a bed of paper towel to soak up any extra grease.  Just a quick dab (top and bottom) will go a long way to remove the excess grease that is on bacon strips.  You can serve it to your family still on the paper towel, but if you have guests you may want to class it up and put in a separate warm covered dish.  Warm bacon is always better than cold so do your best to keep it classy and tasty.

Storing

We recommend that you eat bacon within 4 to 6 weeks if you are storing it in the fridge.  We have heard of people storing it for even longer, but if you really don’t think you will eat it within a month then just throw it in the freezer (where time slows down kind of the opposite of dog years) and then you have about a year before you should reconsider your bacon eating habits.

Bacon loves the freezer.  Turns out bacon that is frozen tastes as good, maybe even better than bacon that has not been frozen.  Who knew?  

We freeze all the bacon prior to shipping so that it remains cool in transit.  Its a cured meat so technically  it can be stored outside refrigeration (like in a root cellar or wine)  but we don’t recommend storing out of refrigeration for any length of time.  Anyway, we are not in France where they leave  the milk out on the counter? Crazy right?  In America we  believe in refrigeration and don’t really know where  to find a root cellar except maybe historic Williamsburg or Amish country. Anyway don’t be afraid to freeze the stuff and when you want bacon, either throw it in the fridge overnight to thaw or submerse it in warm water for 15 minutes and you will be ready to go.

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